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E-Education

E-Education

Watch recordings from our past Educational Events at your leisure anywhere and anytime! Our E-Education has more than 400 presentations that cover important Alpha-1 related topics.

You can also search for more presentations on Vimeo at http://vimeo.com/a1f

This program provides the Alpha-1 Community with access to educational programs from our National Conference and National Education Series.

We gratefully acknowledge all our speakers who volunteered their time and gave permission to record and disseminate their presentations.

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What is a Carrier?

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

50 Years of Alpha-1 History and Into the Future

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Mark Brantly, MD's, Bio:plus

Dr. Brantly is Professor of Medicine, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology in the University of Florida’s Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. He is also Associate Director of the University of Florida’s Clinical Resource Center. The Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank is operated under the direction of Dr. Brantly at the University of Florida. He has been extremely active in researching Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency for over 20 years and has worked with the Alpha-1 Foundation to increase national awareness about the disease and its effects on deficient individuals. Dr. Brantly has been influential in expanding the Florida screening program and has helped coordinate efforts with the Medical University of South Carolina to increase responses to the Alpha-1 Coded Testing Study, a confidential and free testing service encouraging people to screen themselves for early detection. Dr. Brantly has been awarded several honors including the Parker Family Fellowship in Pulmonary Research, the Alpha One Research Professorship, the Alpha-1 National Association Award, and the Visiting Professor Award from the Universita degli Studi di Modena.

The Pros and Cons of Interventional Pulmonology for Alphas
Topics : Lung , Oxygen

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Mark Brantly, MD's, Bio:plus

Dr. Brantly is Professor of Medicine, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology in the University of Florida’s Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. He is also Associate Director of the University of Florida’s Clinical Resource Center. The Alpha-1 Foundation DNA and Tissue Bank is operated under the direction of Dr. Brantly at the University of Florida. He has been extremely active in researching Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency for over 20 years and has worked with the Alpha-1 Foundation to increase national awareness about the disease and its effects on deficient individuals. Dr. Brantly has been influential in expanding the Florida screening program and has helped coordinate efforts with the Medical University of South Carolina to increase responses to the Alpha-1 Coded Testing Study, a confidential and free testing service encouraging people to screen themselves for early detection. Dr. Brantly has been awarded several honors including the Parker Family Fellowship in Pulmonary Research, the Alpha One Research Professorship, the Alpha-1 National Association Award, and the Visiting Professor Award from the Universita degli Studi di Modena.

Alpha-1 Liver Disease
Topics : Liver

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Alpha-1 Lung Disease
Topics : Lung

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Alpha-1 Lung Disorder and Research Update
Topics : Lung

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Alpha-1 Liver Disease
Topics : Liver

Rob Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Myths and Realities of Alpha-1

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

The Importance of Exercise

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

Oxygen: The Gas We Love to Hate

Robert A. Sandhaus, MD's, Bio:plus

Robert “Sandy” Sandhaus graduated from Haverford College in Pennsylvania with a degree in molecular biology. He then received a PhD in cell biology and an MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston and a pulmonary fellowship at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was then appointed to the UCSF medical faculty and subsequently joined the medical faulty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 1981 where he founded the Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency Program at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver and remains its director. His research throughout his academic career has centered on the role of white blood cell enzymes in the prevention and promotion of lung disease. This work led to a special clinical interest in patients with the genetic deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin. In addition to his ongoing academic career. Dr. Sandhaus briefly left medical practice to work in research and development in the biopharmaceutical industry. He ran clinical development programs at Cortech, NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, and Gilead Sciences. Dr. Sandhaus has served on the Boards of Directors of the Alpha-1 Association, the Alpha-1 Foundation, AlphaNet, and the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. For the past five years, he has been the Executive Vice President and Medical Director of AlphaNet and the Clinical Director of the Alpha-1 Foundation. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, and critical care medicine. He lives in Bow Mar, Colorado.

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